CMUS

CMUS is a popular music player for the console. The reason I turned to it is because it uses the familiar Vi key bindings for most of its operations.

To install cmus:

$ sudo apt install cmus

The CMUS interface can be quite confusing to understand at first. It is highly recommended to read the short tutorial before using it:

$ man cmus-tutorial

For more information about its operation:

$ man cmus

Some common operations I use in CMUS:

  • 5: Browser view, used to add music files to library.
  • a: Add music files under cursor to library in Browser view.
  • 2: Library view, shows the music files added.
  • Enter: Play music file under cursor
  • c: Toggle pause-unpause
  • b: Play next song
  • C: Set songs in Library to play one after another
  • r: Set songs in Library to repeat
  • s: Set songs in Library to play in shuffle order
  • :clear: Clear files in Library
  • :q: Quit CMUS

One feature from MOC that I miss in CMUS is I would like it to keep playing in the background after I quit it. This is not possible in CMUS. Instead, what I do is that I launch CMUS in real terminal Ctrl + Alt + F1 and switch back to Ctrl + Alt + F7 for my work.

Tried with: CMUS 2.5.0 and Ubuntu 14.04

Vi File Manager

Vi File Manager (vifm) is a terminal file manager for users familiar with the Vim editor. Its two-pane interface is similar to Midnight Commander. However, the navigation, select, cut-copy-paste commands are similar to that in Vim.

To install vifm from Ubuntu repository:

$ sudo apt install vifm

However, I found that this version of vifm is very old. The most recent vifm can be easily downloaded from here and compiled using:

$ ./configure
$ make
$ sudo make install

Tried with: Vifm 0.7.7 and Ubuntu 14.04

How to view SMB network using SMBTree

SMBTree is a terminal program that can be used to view all the SMB domains, servers and shares visible on the network. Its display is similar to what is seen in Network Neighborhood in Windows.

It ships in the smbclient package, so to install it:

$ sudo apt install smbclient

To view the SMB network:

$ smbtree

Tried with: SMBTree 4.1.6 and Ubuntu 14.04

How to view images in terminal using ShellPic

ShellPic is a program that can be used to view images at any terminal. It renders the image using ASCII art and in color.

ShellPic is not packaged for Ubuntu yet. So, it can be installed from PyPI instead:

$ sudo pip install ShellPic

After installation, it can be invoked directly on any image:

$ shellpic foo.jpg

Tried with: ShellPic 1.6 and Ubuntu 14.04

How to view PDF in terminal using FBGS

Framebuffer Ghostscript Viewer (fbgs) can be used to view PostScript (PS) and PDF files at the terminal. However, it only works with real terminals (/dev/tty) and not with pseudo terminals (/dev/pts).

fbgs ships along with the fbi package. So, to install it:

$ sudo apt install fbi

To be enable use of the program by any user, the username must be added to video group:

$ sudo usermod -a -G video joe

To view a PDF file:

$ fbgs foo.pdf

Tried with: FBI 2.07-11 and Ubuntu 14.04

How to view images in terminal using FBI

Framebuffer Image Viewer (fbi) is a program that can be used to view images at the terminal. However, it only works with actual terminals (/dev/tty), that is the terminals you get when you press Ctrl + Alt + F1 to Ctrl + Alt + F6. It does not work in pseudo terminals (/dev/pts) that are used by terminal programs running in X, like GNOME Terminal.

To install fbi:

$ sudo apt install fbi

Before using the viewer, your username needs to be added to the video group. For example, to add user joe:

$ sudo usermod -a -G video joe

After this, any image can be viewed at a real terminal using fbi:

$ fbi foo.jpg

Tried with: FBI 2.07-11 and Ubuntu 14.04